POST-COVID

an undefined new normal

where are we now?

This is a period of great uncertainty
Uncertainty in public health, in government and in the economy.

As we contemplate going back to work we face new anxieties. Our colleagues might be a health risk. Is the air being circulated frequently? Are cleaning protocols adequate? Have visitors have traveled to infected or at-risk zones? The list goes on.

Because of this gap in our knowledge, it’s difficult to inspire a sense of trust and safety for the people returning to work.

what the future isn't

One size does not fit all.
Let's keep it real people. There isn't one solution for every place and project type. We have some information but need A LOT more.

this too shall change

Avoid overreaction
We aren’t scientists. We’re designers and architects. Ideas presented are informed by CDC and state recommendations for physical distancing, and our passion for figuring stuff out. Some of this might not work, and we’re ok with that. We’ll continue to blitz this and come up with more hacks. It’s what we do.

our approach

Wellbeing​ = intersection of physical, emotional, and mental elements.

The new level of health and safety employees require takes our already inclusive approach to a new level.

objectives

Let’s break it down, here’s what we know we need to do.

1. Improve the perception of well-being in the office.

2. Build confidence around returning to the workplace.

3. Increase user’s choice, addressing individual needs and concerns.

4. Make it work: use reconfiguration and augmentation to minimize expense.

5. Design to intuitively influence physical distancing.

• Rotate desks to sit back-to-back versus face-to-face

• Repurpose movable furniture and plants to adjust traffic patterns

• No more than 10 people in enclosed spaces, remove chairs and space 6’

• Leave door propped open for immediate touchless entry

• Remove castors from chairs to keep distances fixed

• Declutter to make surfaces easier to clean and create wider paths of travel

• Utilize outdoor spaces

• For fixed seating like stadium seating, mark out individual seats with tape

• Post phased staffing plans around the office

• Create PPE pick-up and disposal stations throughout the office

• Install sanitation stations (hand washing, sprays, wipes, etc)

• Install all-mounted or fixed hand sanitizer stations in conspicuous locations

• Post cleaning schedules for transparency to staff

 

Having established that putting ourselves in hermetically sealed bubbles (or the architectural equivalent) or treating humans like cattle with one-way corridors is not the answer, we still do need to provide for physical distancing in the workplace.

The Blitz
Hula Hoop Rule


Visualize what safe distancing looks like, use a hula hoop.

*Hula hoops are 40-44” in diameter so if everyone “wears” one and doesn’t overlap you’re 6’ apart.

public spaces

reconfiguration concepts

_easy adds

Germ free button pusher, etiquette signage,
hands free door openers


Sneeze guards for reception


Washing and disinfection stations

Shoeless office,
locker storage to reduce exposure points

shared spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Provide personal cutlery kits and cleaning accessories

Add protection through dividers and screens

work stations

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Redefine spaces and add protection with modular/
moveable walls, panels, and screens

Clean the air with portable air purifiers, living walls,
and opening windows

Direct traffic, prompt changes with graphics, furniture, and art.

Download the PDF.

learn and
adjust

Let’s experiment. We shouldn’t expect to get it right out of the gate. As we figure this out we'll update this site.

Want some help? Get in touch!

Click here for the latest copy of the Hacker's Guide.

 

415.525.9179
hello@studioblitz.com

Watch our Co-founder Melissa talk about the future of workplace with some really smart people here.

an undefined new normal

where are we now?

This is a period of great uncertainty
Uncertainty in public health, in government and in the economy.

As we contemplate going back to work we face new anxieties. Our colleagues might be a health risk. Is the air being circulated frequently? Are cleaning protocols adequate? Have visitors have traveled to infected or at-risk zones? The list goes on.

Because of this gap in our knowledge, it’s difficult to inspire a sense of trust and safety for the people returning to work.

what the future isn't

One size does not fit all.
Let's keep it real people. There isn't one solution for every place and project type. We have some information but need A LOT more.

this too shall change

Avoid overreaction
We aren’t scientists. We’re designers and architects. Ideas presented are informed by CDC and state recommendations for physical distancing, and our passion for figuring stuff out. Some of this might not work, and we’re ok with that. We’ll continue to blitz this and come up with more hacks. It’s what we do.

our approach

Wellbeing​ = intersection of physical, emotional, and mental elements
The new level of health and safety employees takes our already inclusive approach to a new level.

objectives

Let’s break it down, here’s what we know we need to do.

1. Improve the perception of well-being in the office.

2. Build confidence around returning to the workplace.

3. Increase user’s choice of work setting.

4. Make it work: use reconfiguration and augmentation to minimize expense.

5. Design to intuitively influence physical distancing.

Having established that putting ourselves in hermetically sealed bubbles (or the architectural equivalent) or treating humans like cattle with one-way corridors is not the answer, we still do need to provide for physical distancing in the workplace.

• Rotate desks to sit back-to-back versus face-to-face

• Repurpose movable furniture and plants to adjust traffic patterns

• No more than 10 people in enclosed spaces, remove chairs and space 6’

• Leave door propped open for immediate touchless entry

• Remove castors from chairs to keep distances fixed

• Declutter to make surfaces easier to clean and create wider paths of travel

• Utilize outdoor spaces

• For fixed seating like stadium seating, mark out individual seats with tape

• Post phased staffing plans around the office

• Create PPE pick-up and disposal stations throughout the office

• Install sanitation stations (hand washing, sprays, wipes, etc)

• Install all-mounted or fixed hand sanitizer stations in conspicuous locations

• Post cleaning schedules for transparency to staff

The Blitz
Hula Hoop Rule

Visualize what safe distancing looks like, use a hula hoop.

*Hula hoops are 40-44” in diameter so if everyone “wears” one and doesn’t overlap you’re 6’ apart.

public spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Germ free button pusher, etiquette signage,
hands free door openers



Sneeze guards for reception



Washing and disinfection stations

Shoeless office,
locker storage to reduce exposure points

shared spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Provide personal cutlery kits and cleaning accessories

Add protection through dividers and screens

work stations

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Redefine spaces and add protection with modular/
moveable walls, panels, and screens


Clean the air with portable air purifiers, living walls,
and opening windows

Direct traffic, prompt changes with graphics, furniture, and art.

Download the PDF.

learn and
adjust

Let’s experiment. We shouldn’t expect to get it right out of the gate. As we figure this out we'll update this site.

Want some help? Get in touch!

Click here for the latest copy of the Hacker's Guide.

 

415.525.9179
hello@studioblitz.com

Watch our Co-founder Melissa talk about the future of workplace with some really smart people here.

an undefined new normal

where are we now?

This is a period of great uncertainty
Uncertainty in public health, in government and in the economy.

As we contemplate going back to work we face new anxieties. Our colleagues might be a health risk. Is the air being circulated frequently? Are cleaning protocols adequate? Have visitors have traveled to infected or at-risk zones? The list goes on.

Because of this gap in our knowledge, it’s difficult to inspire a sense of trust and safety for the people returning to work.

what the future isn't

One size does not fit all.
Let's keep it real people. There isn't one solution for every place and project type. We have some information but need A LOT more.

this too shall change

Avoid overreaction
We aren’t scientists. We’re designers and architects. Ideas presented are informed by CDC and state recommendations for physical distancing, and our passion for figuring stuff out. Some of this might not work, and we’re ok with that. We’ll continue to blitz this and come up with more hacks. It’s what we do.

our approach

Wellbeing​ = intersection of physical, emotional, and mental elements
The new level of health and safety employees require takes our already inclusive approach to a new level

objectives

Let’s break it down, here’s what we know we need to do.

1. Improve the perception of well-being in the office.

2. Build confidence around returning to the workplace.

3. Increase user’s choice of work setting.

4. Make it work: use reconfiguration and augmentation to minimize expense.

5. Design to intuitively influence physical distancing.

Having established that putting ourselves in hermetically sealed bubbles (or the architectural equivalent) or treating humans like cattle with one-way corridors is not the answer, we still do need to provide for physical distancing in the workplace.

• Rotate desks to sit back-to-back versus face-to-face

• Repurpose movable furniture and plants to adjust traffic patterns

• No more than 10 people in enclosed spaces, remove chairs and space 6’

• Leave door propped open for immediate touchless entry

• Remove castors from chairs to keep distances fixed

• Declutter to make surfaces easier to clean and create wider paths of travel

• Utilize outdoor spaces

• For fixed seating like stadium seating, mark out individual seats with tape

• Post phased staffing plans around the office

• Create PPE pick-up and disposal stations throughout the office

• Install sanitation stations (hand washing, sprays, wipes, etc)

• Install all-mounted or fixed hand sanitizer stations in conspicuous locations

• Post cleaning schedules for transparency to staff

The Blitz
Hula Hoop Rule

Visualize what safe distancing looks like, use a hula hoop!

*Hula hoops are 40-44” in diameter so if everyone “wears” one and doesn’t overlap you’re 6’ apart.

public spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Germ free button pusher, etiquette signage,
hands free door openers



Sneeze guards for reception


Washing and
disinfection stations

Shoeless office,
locker storage to reduce exposure points

shared spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Provide personal cutlery kits and cleaning accessories

Add protection through dividers and screens

work stations

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Redefine spaces and add protection with modular/
moveable walls, panels, and screens


Clean the air with portable air purifiers, living walls,
and opening windows

Direct traffic, prompt changes with graphics, furniture, and art.

Download the PDF.

learn and
adjust

Let’s experiment. We shouldn’t expect to get it right out of the gate. As we figure this out we'll update this site.

Want some help? Get in touch!

Click here for the latest copy of the Hacker's Guide.

 

415.525.9179
hello@studioblitz.com

Watch our Co-founder Melissa talk about the future of workplace with some really smart people here.

an undefined new normal

where are we now?

This is a period of great uncertainty
Uncertainty in public health, in government and in the economy.

As we contemplate going back to work we face new anxieties. Our colleagues might be a health risk. Is the air being circulated frequently? Are cleaning protocols adequate? Have visitors have traveled to infected or at-risk zones? The list goes on.

Because of this gap in our knowledge, it’s difficult to inspire a sense of trust and safety for the people returning to work.

what the future isn't

One size does not fit all.
Let's keep it real people. There isn't one solution for every place and project type. We have some information but need A LOT more.

this too shall change

Avoid overreaction
We aren’t scientists. We’re designers and architects. Ideas presented are informed by CDC and state recommendations for physical distancing, and our passion for figuring stuff out. Some of this might not work, and we’re ok with that. We’ll continue to blitz this and come up with more hacks. It’s what we do.

our approach

Wellbeing​ = intersection of physical, emotional, and mental elements.
The new level of health and safety employees require takes our already inclusive approach to a new level.

objectives

Let’s break it down, here’s what we know we need to do.

1. Improve the perception of well-being in the office.

2. Build confidence around returning to the workplace.

3. Increase user’s choice of work setting.

4. Make it work: use reconfiguration and augmentation to minimize expense.

5. Design to intuitively influence physical distancing.

Having established that putting ourselves in hermetically sealed bubbles (or the architectural equivalent) or treating humans like cattle with one-way corridors is not the answer, we still do need to provide for physical distancing in the workplace.

• Rotate desks to sit back-to-back versus face-to-face

• Repurpose movable furniture and plants to adjust traffic patterns

• No more than 10 people in enclosed spaces, remove chairs and space 6’

• Leave door propped open for immediate touchless entry

• Remove castors from chairs to keep distances fixed

• Declutter to make surfaces easier to clean and create wider paths of travel

• Utilize outdoor spaces

• For fixed seating like stadium seating, mark out individual seats with tape

• Post phased staffing plans around the office

• Create PPE pick-up and disposal stations throughout the office

• Install sanitation stations (hand washing, sprays, wipes, etc)

• Install all-mounted or fixed hand sanitizer stations in conspicuous locations

• Post cleaning schedules for transparency to staff

The Blitz
Hula Hoop Rule

Visualize what safe distancing looks like, use a hula hoop.

*Hula hoops are 40-44” in diameter so if everyone “wears” one and doesn’t overlap you’re 6’ apart.

public spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Germ free button pusher, etiquette signage, hands free door openers

Sneeze guards for reception

Washing and disinfection stations

Shoeless office, locker storage to reduce exposure points

shared spaces

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Provide personal cutlery kits and cleaning accessories

Add protection through dividers and screens

work stations

reconfiguration concepts

easy adds

Redefine spaces and add protection with modular/moveable walls, panels, and screens


Clean the air with portable air purifiers, living walls,
and opening windows

Direct traffic, prompt changes with graphics, furniture, and art.

Download the PDF.

learn and
adjust

Let’s experiment. We shouldn’t expect to get it right out of the gate. As we figure this out we'll update this site.

Want some help? Get in touch!

Click here for the latest copy of the Hacker's Guide.

 

415.525.9179
hello@studioblitz.com

Watch our Co-founder Melissa talk about the future of workplace with some really smart people here.

SF

415.525.9179

435 JACKSON STREET

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111

LA

310.343.5856

2633 FAIRFAX AVENUE

CULVER CITY, CA 90232

DENVER

720.370.1618

1800 WAZEE STREET, SUITE 363
DENVER, CO 80202

© 2020 BLITZ

SF

415.525.9179

435 JACKSON STREET

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111

LA

310.343.5856

2633 FAIRFAX AVENUE

CULVER CITY, CA 90232

DENVER

720.370.1618

1800 WAZEE STREET, SUITE 363

DENVER, CO 80202

© 2020 BLITZ